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Intel in talks to buy GlobalFoundries

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Written by Guillaume
Publication date: {{ dayjs(1627228832*1000).local().format("L").toString()}}
This article is an automatic translation

The American company would be ready to put $30 billion on the table to buy the second largest independent foundry in the world.

That would be a nice way to thumb your nose at history. Perhaps the name GlobalFoundries means nothing to you? Perhaps you only know the company today, a semiconductor giant that is one of the very few to have production centers in Asia, North America and Europe? However, GlobalFoundries is much more than that and, before 2009, all its structures were in the hands of AMD. It was in 2008 that the Ryzen inventor decided to review its organization and turn to the fabless model.

GlobalFoundries then became a separate entity. An entity that has worked quite well and that is now being targeted by... Intel, of which AMD is one of the fiercest competitors. According to a source close to the main parties involved and reported by the Wall Street Journal, Intel has even started talks with GlobalFoundries to buy its activities. While the current context of semiconductors is tense to say the least, Intel is clearly looking to boost its own production capacity. The American company has already talked about expanding and building several of its own facilities, but the purchase of GlobalFoundries would allow it to boost its production capacity in one fell swoop and around the world.

Some observers also point out that this acquisition - if it comes to fruition - would be an excellent way to launch the IDM 2.0 program that Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger is supporting. This Integrated Device Manufacturing plan is based on the American giant's desire to offer its chip production services to third-party companies that specialize in the design of new components. While it is the production structures that are most lacking today, the acquisition of GlobalFoundries would logically place Intel in a strong position compared to its competitors.